Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

What is Holistic Nutrition?

Why seek the services of a Holistic Nutritionist?

What is the difference between a Dietician and a Certified Nutritional Practitioner?

Are any of these nutritional services covered under OHIP?

Will I have to refrain from eating my favorite foods?

Will the recommendations you make be expensive to maintain?


What is Holistic Nutrition?

Holistic Nutritionists are highly trained and experienced health professionals in natural health and nutrition. They believe that diet, lifestyle and the environment play a key role in our mental, physical and emotional well-being.
Holistic Nutritionists work one on one with their clients providing nutritional analysis which helps determine the current status of their body’s nutritional health. Nutritional imbalances, if left uncorrected, may cause or contribute to an array of health problems including poor weight management, fatigue, blood sugar imbalances, learning disabilities, heart disease, diabetes, auto-immune diseases and sleep disturbances.
Based on the state of their client’s nutritional status and their client’s health goals, Holistic Nutritionists devise a customized lifestyle and diet modification program that fits into their lifestyle. They may recommend certain foods, supplements, herbs, exercise and lifestyle changes to provide the body with what is missing, and to assist the body in its function and healing abilities.

Why seek the services of a Holistic Nutritionist?

Clients may seek guidance in the following areas:

  • Fatigue, low energy
  • Weight management
  • Detoxification
  • Blood sugar balancing, hypoglycemia
  • Digestive support
  • Immune system support
  • Environmental/food allergies and sensitivities
  • Stress, anxiety, depression
  • PMS, infertility, menopause
  • Pre and post natal nutrition
  • High blood pressure, high cholesterol
  • Arthritis
  • Sleep disorders

What is the difference between a Dietician and a Certified Nutritional Practitioner?

Dieticians have a Bachelor Degree in Human Nutrition, and complete a practical internship in a community or hospital setting to gain clinical experience in their field of employment. They work either in private GP clinics, or often at government institutions such as hospitals, nursing homes, schools, and assisted living homes. They follow and teach the recommendations set out by the Canadian Food Guide. They are registered to practice with the Health Professions Council and are regulated under the Regulated Health Practitioners Act.

Certified Nutritional Practitioners (CNP’s) have a Diploma in Applied Holistic Nutrition after an extensive practical and disciplinary program from the Institute of Holistic Nutrition. In addition to the core human nutrition courses such as anatomy and physiology, chemistry, advanced nutrition research, biochemistry, pathology and disease prevention and management; CNP’s study holistic views of health and wellness such as herbal medicine, Ayurvedic medicine, nutrition and the environment, the psychology of disease, natural supplementation, and holistic food preparation. They generally work in private clinics as educators and advisors on whole foods nutrition. Instead of following the Canadian Food Guide, CNP’s believe that each individual is biochemically unique, and they assess individual nutritional imbalances and weaknesses. Along with suitable food choices for each individual; environmental pollution, metal toxicity, micro-organism imbalances, and food sensitivities are among other factors that CNP’s consider when constructing a nutrition program. Technically by law, anyone can call themselves a nutritionist, however only those who graduated from the Institute of Holistic Nutrition can call themselves a CNP. CNP’s are recognized and approved by the Certified Nutritional Practitioners Council of Canada (CNPCC), and the International Organization of Nutritional Consultants (IONC).

Are any of these nutritional services covered under OHIP?

Some extended OHIP coverage may cover nutrition consultations with a CNP. Check with your insurance company to find out what your coverage includes.

Will I have to refrain from eating my favorite foods?

The goal of “Roots of Health” is to address the underlying “root” causes of dis-ease in the body. Real food should never be the source of a problem for someone, however sometimes if the body is in a weakened state due to toxicity, nutritional excesses or nutritional deficiencies, even small amounts of certain foods or environmental exposures could cause unneeded suffering. The correct response to this would not be to permanently eliminate this food, but instead to remove it temporarily, address possible underlying issues, restore strength and health, and then re-introduce it back in moderation with a variety of other health giving foods so you can enjoy not only a good life, but a healthy life full of energy and vitality. The ultimate goal is to have a strong enough disposition to be able to handle the day to day stressors of life, instead of avoiding pieces of what makes life both happy and healthy.

Will the recommendations you make be expensive to maintain?

No. This is a common misconception with changing your diet to whole, sometimes even organic foods. Whole foods are more nutritionally dense, meaning they supply more of a nutrition punch. When you eat processed or nutritionally devoid food, your body is being drained of nutrients used to break down these “foods” while not receiving any needed nutrients. You will continue to be hungry in order to meet your nutritional needs, thus will eat more. In addition, purchasing food in its original, whole form instead of pre-packaged convenience forms are often more economical (and always more environmental). The majority of food costs in this country go toward packaging, so buying fresh, buying bulk and avoiding packaged foods saves you money. And rememeber, it is far more expensive to wait until you get sick and “pay for it later” than to spend the time and make the effort to make preventative changes today.